Soaked Heads

The Church does not lack for information. We are not hungry souls emerging from the Dark Ages–yearning with the appetite for knowledge and education to feed our eager minds and hearts. Nah, we’re drowning in it. We’ve gorged ourselves on so much information, know-how, DIY’s, hacks, lectures, TED talks, and memes that we’re in serious need of a good vomit so we can evacuate the mind for real instruction.

In our enthusiasm with our ability to create and distribute huge amounts of information, we have assembled an array of isolated data so separated from each other that they have lost all meaning within the whole. Now we are merely an army of specialists who have no sense of where our fields of interest intersects with anything else. From here I will refer you to Clausewitz:

Thus it has come about that our theoretical and critical literature, instead of giving plain, straightforward arguments in which the author at least always knows what he is saying and the reader what he is reading, is crammed with jargon, ending at obscure crossroads where the author loses its readers. Sometimes these books are even worse: they are just hollow shells. The author himself no longer knows just what he is thinking and soothes himself with obscure ideas which would not satisfy him if expressed in plain speech.

I think perhaps we have moved to the opposite extreme: In Clausewitz’s day the literature tended to be gaseous and bombastic. No modern today would have the concentration to endure them. But we live in a reduction of ideas. Given the copious volume of information facing us, we must restrict it into bite-size chunks that we can easily digest. Now, either we repeat religious maxims–pithy statements–or preponderous theological constructs, which leave the listener more confused, as essential ideas become broken more and more into smaller, isolated incidents. We subsist off trite memes which only scratch at the surface of meaning and do not plunge into its depths. They act as a feather brushing across the mind and heart, inspiring a sense of knowledge, but without any actual effect. There is no intimate interaction in the mind; no wrestling, no struggle or compromise, no resolution. There is nothing to bring about a lasting change. It creates the impression of change because the listener has glimpsed something true. But he has not known it. The difference is far and wide.

IMG_1241
Here’s a pretty picture to break up the text!

 

Education  is not information. Education and learning can only be accomplished in the context of relationship. It is probably the most inefficient way of developing a person’s understanding. Knowledge is only as useful as far as one is able and willing to communicate and relate it to others. The Church hasn’t lost influence through being wrong, but because it has lost its effectual voice. We must understand our times on every level, and be prepared to understand men and women when we meet them. We cannot steep our heads in scripture and spiritual influences and expect that we will be effective in a world we do not know.

Advertisements

Daring and Danger

“Although our intellect always feels itself urged toward clearness and certainty, still our mind often feels itself attracted by uncertainty. Instead of threading its way with the understanding along the narrow path of philosophical investigations and logical conclusions, in order, almost unconscious of itself, to arrive in spaces where it feels itself a stranger, and where it seems to part from all well-known objects, it prefers to remain with the imagination in the realms of chance and luck. Instead of living yonder on poor necessity, it revels here in the wealth of possibilities; animated thereby, courage then takes wings to itself, and daring and danger make the element into which it launches itself as a fearless swimmer plunges into the stream.”

~Carl Von Clausewitz, On War. Vol. 1